Concerts come with a lot of details. It can be easy to forget the basics while you’re busy planning the day, managing a team of volunteers, making sure there is sufficient security, and marketing your event. Here is a quick checklist of reminders:

☑ WELCOME

Welcoming and thanking the artist team is important, whether that’s by putting a nice note, campus swag, or a sign in the green room or greeting them at the bus with a wave and a helping hand.

☑ WATER

Make sure you have plenty of cases of water for the artists, the production company, volunteers and more from the time everyone arrives to the end of load out. If you are being more environmentally conscious, aim for boxed water, water stations or fountains, etc. Artists specifically want some of that water to be room temperature.

☑ FOOD

Many artists don’t list dinner on their rider, but they still expect it. Ask either during advance or upon arrival what the team is thinking for dinner. Order out from menus, organize catering, or have a plan for timing and delivery of food. Don’t forget to feed your production team if that is also expected.

☑ WORKERS

More commonly referred to as “hands,” artist teams and production companies expect a certain number of helpers to assist with loading in and out their equipment. Be sure to ask both the artist and production teams how many hands are needed and when. Ensure those workers arrive on time with real shoes (no sandals/flip flops/heels) and can be professional and helpful the entire time.

☑ BARRICADES AND BIKE RACK

Yes it’s important to have a real barricade in front of the stage. This provides some separation between the artist team and the audience, and a lane for your security to stand to watch the crowd. Mojo barricade, or the big black L-shaped barricade that gets stronger the more people stand on it, is important to have the length of the stage. Bike rack can fill in along the sides or for corralling audience, as well as surrounding the front of house audio/lighting mixing production area in the audience, to prevent the crowd from bumping equipment and people trying to work on the show.

☑ MERCH TABLES

Even if you are not collecting any merchandise proceeds from the artist or assisting with sales, make sure you always have access to a few 6’ or 8’ tables in case the artist needs them.

☑ PRIVATE SOUND CHECK

It’s important whenever possible to ensure that the sound check time for the artist is private, and anyone working knows not to take photographs without permission. If you are in an open space with no fencing, be sure to warn the artist a private sound check is not possible, but also be willing to ask potential passersby to move along and not take photos in respect of the artist’s privacy.

☑ THANK YOU

Don’t forget to do a final touch base and goodbye/thank you with the tour manager to ensure any last notes are communicated before the artist leaves the building.

Jolene Chevalier

Founder & Talent Buyer | How To Concerts

Jolene has been a middle buyer for over a decade, helping colleges and others with their concerts, comedians, and speakers. (And, yes, she is named after the Dolly Parton song.) She would love to talk with you about helping to book, plan, and prepare for your event.

920.764.1200   |   [email protected]

Jolene Chevalier

Founder & Talent Buyer | How To Concerts

Jolene has been a middle buyer for over a decade, helping colleges and others with their concerts, comedians, and speakers. (And, yes, she is named after the Dolly Parton song.) She would love to talk with you about helping to book, plan, and prepare for your event.

920.764.1200   |   [email protected]