Confession: sometimes I’m a music snob.

I smirk at cheesy lyrics.  I cringe at gushy love songs with no depth.  I roll my eyes at yet another all-too-catchy Pop song.  However, being a middle agent has taught me how to put away my inner music snob and appreciate music for what it is and what it brings to the table.  It brings people together.  Music brings people physically together for a live performance, and it gives listeners a way to connect intellectually and emotionally.  Seeing a live performance creates lasting memories and endless conversation topics.  Also, as live entertainment planners, planning a live performance allows your team to practice teamwork, hone skills, and be a part of something exciting.  Throughout my daily work, my inner music snob is silenced as I see the positive effects music has on all of us.

For the Listener

A few weeks ago, my inner music snob was just about to rear its ugly head when an unexpected surprise slammed it back down like a jack-in-the-box.  While my family was camping, the park rangers stopped at our site to tell us that the park’s amphitheater was hosting some live music that night.  My inner music snob smirked and thought “I can’t wait to see what tone deaf acapella church lady choir the local state park has to offer…” but, we decided to check it out.  As we walked through the woods, we suddenly heard a gorgeous duet of Glen Hansard & Marketa Irglova’s “Falling Slowly.”  Our family sat down and listened intently.  There stood three older men and a woman performing, in jeans and sweatshirts, with minimal equipment, on a wooden stage in the middle of the woods.  And it was beautiful.  As I scanned the audience, the other campers were smiling and some were almost tearing up.  I will never forget that moment and how quiet my three kids sat as they listened to the performance.  The band moved into classics by Crosby Stills & Nash, U2, and more.  In any other setting, it might not have been as moving and amazing, but here in the woods – it was perfect.  

That performance reminded me that we often have to put away our inner music snob and appreciate any and all genres of music, lyrics, and artists.  Our experience is often entirely based on our mindset.  Decide before an event that, no matter what, you will have a good time. You’ll be surprised at how much fun you have.

For the Planner

When planning entertainment, remember to put away your own music snob for the sake of the event.   If you don’t like the genre of music your team has decided to book or you don’t enjoy the artist, that’s okay.  Just appreciate what you are doing – planning an event that will bring people together and provide lasting memories.  Focus on creating a great experience for your audience, regardless of the artist, and be aware of what you yourself are getting out of the process.  Get excited about the event as opposed to the artist, and your enthusiasm will be contagious.  Put away that music snob and embrace the bigger picture.  

Jolene Chevalier

Founder & Talent Buyer | How To Concerts

Jolene has been a middle buyer for over a decade, helping colleges and others with their concerts, comedians, and speakers. (And, yes, she is named after the Dolly Parton song.) She would love to talk with you about helping to book, plan, and prepare for your event.

920.764.1200   |   [email protected]

Jolene Chevalier

Founder & Talent Buyer | How To Concerts

Jolene has been a middle buyer for over a decade, helping colleges and others with their concerts, comedians, and speakers. (And, yes, she is named after the Dolly Parton song.) She would love to talk with you about helping to book, plan, and prepare for your event.

920.764.1200   |   [email protected]