It’s time to start locking in your show day details!  Initial contact should happen between 2-6 weeks out, depending on how far out you need to start advancing.  When you reach out to the artist’s tour manager, here are the first questions you should ask to get the ball rolling:

1. What are your travel plans?

This will allow you to figure out what needs the artist has, such as ground transport timing, parking needs, arrival time to the venue, etc.

2. How many people are in your traveling party?

You’ll need a general sense of what size group you’re hosting to know how many meals are needed, how much room the touring party will need, and how many passes to hand out if you are providing credentials.

3. Any dietary restrictions or allergies to be aware of?

Allergies can be very serious, so it’s good to know about them right away before you plan any snacks or catering.  It will also help you accommodate any vegetarian, vegan, or other special diet requests.

4. Who is your production contact?

Production is a crucial (possibly the most important) detail of an artist’s performance.  It is good to start production conversations early on because they can often affect other parts of your day, your budget, and your overall show set up.  Once you have their production contact, be sure to connect them with whomever is in charge of production on your side.

5. Do you have an updated rider or any new information we should be aware of?

Artists update their riders every few months, so it is key to have the most updated version.  Often the tour manager has the most updated version and it is NOT the same as the rider you may have received with your contract.  Always work from the newest version to make sure the artist has what they need.  

6. What are the best day-of-show phone numbers to use for your team?

This may seem obvious but you’d be shocked how many people forget to collect a cell phone number so they can communicate with the artist team while on the road.

7. How much time would you ideally like for load in? For sound check?

Use this information to start building your day of show timeline.  Work backwards from door time and make sure everyone on your show lineup is given enough time for their load-in and a proper sound check.

8. Do you plan to sell merch?

Follow up questions may include how many tables are needed and whether they need a volunteer to help sell.  Also discuss the merchandise split if you are collecting one.

9. Do you have any photo policies or restrictions?

Your approved media will need to know how much of the show they can photograph and from where.  It is your job to get your media contacts pre-approved and inform them of their restrictions.

10. Do you prefer to do the meet and greet before or after the show?

This not only helps you plan your day of show timeline, but it also helps your committee plan appropriately.  Plus, it reminds the artist team that you want a meet and greet for your group.  A meet and greet is more likely to happen if it’s scheduled.

Asking just these 10 questions will help you jumpstart your advance.  If you work with a middle agent, they may start the advance for you and may even already know this info, so be sure to ask them who is going to reach out to the artist team first.  

Jolene Chevalier

Founder & Talent Buyer | How To Concerts

Jolene has been a middle buyer for over a decade, helping colleges and others with their concerts, comedians, and speakers. (And, yes, she is named after the Dolly Parton song.) She would love to talk with you about helping to book, plan, and prepare for your event.

920.764.1200   |   [email protected]

Jolene Chevalier

Founder & Talent Buyer | How To Concerts

Jolene has been a middle buyer for over a decade, helping colleges and others with their concerts, comedians, and speakers. (And, yes, she is named after the Dolly Parton song.) She would love to talk with you about helping to book, plan, and prepare for your event.

920.764.1200   |   [email protected]